Author Archives: tmacsd

April 26th – Testing

At the Traditional Martial Arts Center for all kyu (colored belt) tests, the candidate at a minimum must demonstrate the Kihon, Kata and Kumite for their rank.

Kihon (Key – hone)(基本) is a Japanese term meaning “basics” or “fundamentals.” The term is used to refer to the basic techniques that are taught and practiced as the foundation of most Japanese martial arts. The practice and mastery of kihon is essential to all advanced training, and includes the practice of correct body form and breathing, while practicing basics such as stances, punches, kicks, blocks, and thrusts, but it also includes basic representative kata.

Kata (Kah – tah)(型 or 形 literally: “form”) is a Japanese word describing detailed choreographed patterns of movements practised either solo or in pairs. The term form is used for the corresponding concept in non-Japanese martial arts in general. Kata is often described as a set sequence of karate moves organized into a pre-arranged fight against imaginary opponents. The kata consists of kicks, punches, sweeps, strikes, blocks, and throws. Body movement in various kata includes stepping, twisting, turning, dropping to the ground, and jumping. In Shotokan, kata is not a performance or a demonstration, but is for individual karateka to practice full techniques—with every technique potentially a killing blow (ikken hisatsu)—while paying particular attention to form and timing (rhythm). As the karateka grows older, more emphasis is placed on the health benefits of practicing kata, promoting fitness while keeping the body soft, supple, and agile.

Kumite(Coo – me – tay) (組手) means sparring, and is one of the three main sections of karate training, along with kata and kihon. Kumite is the part of karate in which you train against an adversary, using the techniques learned from the kihon and kata. Kumite can be used to develop a particular technique or a skill (e.g. effectively judging and adjusting your distance from your opponent) or it can be done in competition.

 
7835 Highland Village Place Suite D104 | San Diego, CA 92129 | Phone 858-232-2631 | email

Batto-do Cutting (Tameshigiri) April 9th at 8:00PM

Batto-do Cutting Ceremony - Wednesday April 9th at 8:00PM

Batto-do Cutting Ceremony – Wednesday April 9th at 8:00PM

Tameshigiri (試し斬り, 試し切り, 試斬, 試切) is the Japanese art of target test cutting. The kanji literally mean “test cut” (kun’yomi: ためし ぎり tameshi giri). This practice was popularized in the Edo period (17th century) for testing the quality of swords and continues through the present day.

Origins

During the Edo period, only the most skilled swordsmen were chosen to test swords, so that the swordsman’s skill was not a variable in how well the sword cut. The materials used to test swords varied greatly. Some substances were wara (rice straw), goza (the top layer of tatami mats),bamboo, and thin steel sheets.

In addition, there were a wide variety of cuts used on the cadavers, from tabi-gata (ankle cut) to O-kesa (diagonal cut from shoulder to opposite hip). The names of the types of cuts on cadavers show exactly where on the body the cut was made. Older swords can still be found today that have inscriptions on their nakago (tang) that say things such as, “5 bodies with Ryu Guruma (hip cut)”.

Aside from specific cuts made on cadavers, there were the normal cuts of Japanese swordsmanship, i.e. downward diagonal (Kesa-giri), upward diagonal (Kiri-age or Gyaku-kesa), horizontal (Yoko or Tsuihei), and straight downward (Jodan-giri, Happonme, Makko-giri, Shinchoku-giri or Dotton-giri). These cuts would then be cut on the cadavers (ex: A swordsman would do a Jodan-giri cut on 3 bodies at the hips. The inscription would then be, “3 bodies Ryu Guruma“).

Today

In modern times, the practice of tameshigiri has come to focus on testing the swordsman’s abilities, rather than the sword’s. Thus, swordsmen sometimes use the terms Shito (試刀, sword testing) and Shizan (試斬, test cutting, an alternate pronunciation of the characters for tameshigiri) to distinguish between the historical practice of testing swords and the contemporary practice of testing one’s cutting ability. The target most often from the tips box 5:00 PM Deleting iPod Music, Software used at present is the goza or tatami “omote” rush mat. To be able to cut consecutive times on one target, or to cut multiple targets while moving, requires that one be a very skilled swordsman.

Targets today are typically made from wara or goza, either bundled or rolled into a tubular shape. They may be soaked in water to add density to the material. This density is to approximate that of flesh. Green bamboo is used to approximate bone.

Once the goza target is in this tubular shape, it has a vertical grain pattern when stood vertically on a target stand, or horizontally when placed on a horizontal target stand (dotton or dodan). This direction of the grain affects the difficulty of the cut.

The difficulty of cuts is a combination of the target material hardness, the direction of the grain of the target (if any), the quality of the sword, the angle of the blade (hasuji) on impact, and the angle of the swing of the sword (tachisuji).

When cutting a straw target that is standing vertically, the easiest cut is the downward diagonal. This is due to a combination of the angle of impact of the cut against the grain (approximately 30-50 degrees from the surface), the downward diagonal angle of the swing, and the ability to use many of the major muscle groups and rotation of the body to aid in the cut.

Next in difficulty is the upward diagonal cut which has the same angle, but works against gravity and uses slightly different muscles and rotation. The third in difficulty is the straight downward cut, not in terms of the grain but in terms of the group of muscles involved. The most difficult cut of these four basic cuts is the horizontal direction (against a vertical target) which is directly perpendicular to the grain of the target.

March 22, 2014 – Bring A Parent Day

 Please Join your child for class at our normal class time of 10:00am to 10:50am.
We will try to start promptly at 1000am. So please show up a few minutes early to get prepared. Also we would recommend wearing comfortable clothing..

 Download (PDF, 178.5KB)

March 22, 2014 - Bring A Parent Day!
March 22, 2014 – Bring A Parent Day!

Download (PDF, 178.5KB)

7835 Highland Village Place Suite D104 | San Diego, CA 92129 | Phone 858-232-2631 or via email

Batto-do Cutting (Tameshigiri) March 12th at 8:00PM

Batto-do Cutting Ceremony - Wednesday March 12thh at 8:00PM

Batto-do Cutting Ceremony – Wednesday March 12th at 8:00PM

Tameshigiri (試し斬り, 試し切り, 試斬, 試切) is the Japanese art of target test cutting. The kanji literally mean “test cut” (kun’yomi: ためし ぎり tameshi giri). This practice was popularized in the Edo period (17th century) for testing the quality of swords and continues through the present day.

Origins

During the Edo period, only the most skilled swordsmen were chosen to test swords, so that the swordsman’s skill was not a variable in how well the sword cut. The materials used to test swords varied greatly. Some substances were wara (rice straw), goza (the top layer of tatami mats),bamboo, and thin steel sheets.

In addition, there were a wide variety of cuts used on the cadavers, from tabi-gata (ankle cut) to O-kesa (diagonal cut from shoulder to opposite hip). The names of the types of cuts on cadavers show exactly where on the body the cut was made. Older swords can still be found today that have inscriptions on their nakago (tang) that say things such as, “5 bodies with Ryu Guruma (hip cut)”.

Aside from specific cuts made on cadavers, there were the normal cuts of Japanese swordsmanship, i.e. downward diagonal (Kesa-giri), upward diagonal (Kiri-age or Gyaku-kesa), horizontal (Yoko or Tsuihei), and straight downward (Jodan-giri, Happonme, Makko-giri, Shinchoku-giri or Dotton-giri). These cuts would then be cut on the cadavers (ex: A swordsman would do a Jodan-giri cut on 3 bodies at the hips. The inscription would then be, “3 bodies Ryu Guruma“).

Today

In modern times, the practice of tameshigiri has come to focus on testing the swordsman’s abilities, rather than the sword’s. Thus, swordsmen sometimes use the terms Shito (試刀, sword testing) and Shizan (試斬, test cutting, an alternate pronunciation of the characters for tameshigiri) to distinguish between the historical practice of testing swords and the contemporary practice of testing one’s cutting ability. The target most often from the tips box 5:00 PM Deleting iPod Music, Software used at present is the goza or tatami “omote” rush mat. To be able to cut consecutive times on one target, or to cut multiple targets while moving, requires that one be a very skilled swordsman.

Targets today are typically made from wara or goza, either bundled or rolled into a tubular shape. They may be soaked in water to add density to the material. This density is to approximate that of flesh. Green bamboo is used to approximate bone.

Once the goza target is in this tubular shape, it has a vertical grain pattern when stood vertically on a target stand, or horizontally when placed on a horizontal target stand (dotton or dodan). This direction of the grain affects the difficulty of the cut.

The difficulty of cuts is a combination of the target material hardness, the direction of the grain of the target (if any), the quality of the sword, the angle of the blade (hasuji) on impact, and the angle of the swing of the sword (tachisuji).

When cutting a straw target that is standing vertically, the easiest cut is the downward diagonal. This is due to a combination of the angle of impact of the cut against the grain (approximately 30-50 degrees from the surface), the downward diagonal angle of the swing, and the ability to use many of the major muscle groups and rotation of the body to aid in the cut.

Next in difficulty is the upward diagonal cut which has the same angle, but works against gravity and uses slightly different muscles and rotation. The third in difficulty is the straight downward cut, not in terms of the grain but in terms of the group of muscles involved. The most difficult cut of these four basic cuts is the horizontal direction (against a vertical target) which is directly perpendicular to the grain of the target.

Bring-A-Friend Day – March 8th

Saturday, March 8th at 10am is “BRING-A-FRIEND DAY!”
Every child is encouraged to invite a friend to be a student of
TMAC for one day. Our students will be able to show what they have
learned at TMAC to their friends. Spreading knowledge of
traditional karate is one of the joys at TMAC.

Please be sure that our guests are wearing comfortable clothing.
Each guest is encouraged to come with a parent. If this is not
possible, please have a written permission slip (note) allowing them
to participate in class.

Download (PDF, 281KB)

Bring-A-Friend Day March 16, 2013
Bring-A-Friend Day March 8, 2014

Download (PDF, 281KB)

7835 Highland Village Place Suite D104 | San Diego, CA 92129 | Phone 858-232-2631 or via email